Tagged: nuts

Peanut Butter Popsicles

Peanut Butter Popsicles
I’ve been breaking my own rules lately. I have a policy that if I haven’t used a gadget, pot, pan or anything else in my kitchen in the last 6 months, I stash it away in a closet to test if I really miss it. If not, it’s ready to be donated. This system works well as long as I set aside the time to actually scan and reassess the crowded shelves in my cabinets.

Last weekend I rediscovered my popsicle molds, so before they hit their expiration date, I put them to use. I made a vegan peanut butter popsicles with almond milk and bananas. After they were frozen, I dipped them in fudge and sprinkled them with salted roasted peanuts. These guilt-free popsicles were a hit with everyone including my three-year-old.
Peanut Butter Popsicles
Peanut Butter Popsicles

Makes 8 3-ounce popsicles

1-1/2 cups almond milk
2 large ripe bananas
1/2 cup smooth peanut butter
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
1 teaspoon agave syrup
4 ounces semi-sweet chocolate chips
2 tablespoons coconut oil
1/4 cup chopped roasted salted peanuts

In a blender, combine the milk, bananas, peanut butter, salt and agave syrup. Blend until smooth. Pour into the popsicle molds and freeze until firm.

Place a wax paper-lined sheet pan in the freezer.

In a microwave-safe bowl, heat the chocolate and coconut oil in 30 second blasts until melted and smooth.

Unmold the popsicles and dip them into the chocolate. Sprinkle with peanuts. Place the popsicles on the prepared sheet pan in the freezer. Allow the chocolate to harden before serving.

Tin Roof Ice Cream

Tin Roof Ice Cream
I’m kind of a kitchen hoarder. Whether it’s pots, pans, or gadgets, I have a hard time getting rid of things because no matter how small the chance is that I will use something, I cling to that glimmer of hope that I might need it. I have the same approach when it comes to ingredients. I do everything I can to not waste food. That explains why I have a freezer full of baked goods and other odds & ends.

I had a bunch of frozen egg yolks in little baggies, so I figured the best way to get rid of them was a batch of ice cream. Since I’m such a fan of chocolate and peanuts, I made a quart of tin roof ice cream—chocolate covered peanuts with a fudge ripple in vanilla ice cream. I folded the peanuts into the ice cream right after it was churned and then alternated layers of ice cream and fudge before freezing.
Tin Roof Ice Cream
Tin Roof Ice Cream

Adapted from The Perfect Scoop by David Lebovitz

Makes about 1 quart

For ice cream
1-1/2 cups heavy cream
4 large egg yolks
3/4 cup whole milk
3/4 cup granulated sugar
Pinch of salt
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

For chocolate covered peanuts
4 ounces bittersweet chocolate
1 cup roasted, salted peanuts

For fudge ripple
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1/3 cup light corn syrup
1/2 cup water
6 tablespoons unsweetened Dutch-process cocoa powder
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract

For the ice cream, pour 1 cup heavy cream into a large bowl and set aside. Whisk the egg yolks in a small bowl.

Combine the milk, sugar, salt and remaining heavy cream in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Simmer until the sugar dissolves. Slowly whisk half the milk mixture into the yolks and then pour it back into the saucepan. Stir continuously until the mixture thickens enough to coat the back of a wooden spoon. Pour through a fine mesh strainer into the bowl with the heavy cream and stir in the vanilla.

For the peanuts, melt the chocolate in a small saucepan over very low heat. Stir in the peanuts coating them in chocolate. Spread out the peanuts on a parchment-lined plate. Chill in the refrigerator until the chocolate hardens and then roughly chop.

For the fudge ripple, combine the sugar, corn syrup, water and cocoa powder in a medium saucepan. Whisk the mixture constantly until it just starts to simmer. Continue whisking for 1 minute before removing from the heat. Stir in the vanilla extract and cool to room temperature. Chill completely in the refrigerator.

Churn the ice cream mixture in an ice cream maker following the manufacturer’s instructions. Stir in the chocolate covered peanuts. In a quart-sized container, layer the fudge ripple and the ice cream in alternating layers, starting with the fudge. Freeze until firm.

Rainbow Carrot Salad

Rainbow Carrot Salad
My closet and my pantry have two very different color schemes. I am an interior designer who works at an architecture firm, so I tend to stick to the unofficial uniform of black and gray. It’s been this way for so long that I don’t think I look good in anything other than cool neutrals anymore, and when I wear the one of the few pieces of colored clothing that’s still hanging around I don’t feel like me.

When I shop for ingredients, it’s the complete opposite of my wardrobe. I can’t get enough brights, the more saturated the better. I nearly cut off someone at the grocery when I spotted multihued carrots across the produce department. I made a crunchy rainbow carrot salad by peeling them into ribbons and tossing them with pistachios, chives and scallions in a cumin-spiced vinaigrette.
When I shop for ingredients, it’s the complete opposite of my wardrobe. I can’t get enough brights, the more saturated the better. I nearly cut off someone at the grocery when I spotted multihued carrots across the produce department. I made a crunchy rainbow carrot salad by peeling them into ribbons and tossing them pistachios, chives and scallions in a cumin-spiced vinaigrette.
Rainbow Carrot Salad

Serves 4

1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
1/4 teaspoon cumin
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
3 tablespoons olive oil
6 rainbow carrots, peeled
1/4 cup chopped salted roasted pistachios
1 tablespoon minced chives
1 scallion, thinly sliced

In a small bowl, whisk together the lemon juice, cumin, salt, pepper and olive oil. Using a vegetable peeler, cut the carrots into long ribbons. Toss the carrots with the vinaigrette, pistachios, chives and scallions.

Pasta with Baby Greens, Beans and Walnuts

Pasta with Baby Greens, Beans and Walnuts
For my usual weeknight pasta I keep things simple with spaghetti, even though it can be a bit boring. When I stick to my routine, I don’t add to my random noodle collection. I have a shelf of partial boxes of pasta—the result of buying specific shapes for single recipes. I always end up with an odd amount that’s too small to feed my family—two adults and a three-year-old who is convinced pasta is its own food group.

To spring clean my kitchen, I made this mixed pasta with baby greens, beans and walnuts. Even though it breaks every pasta rule, all you have to do when cooking multiple shapes in a single pot is to first start with the noodle that has the longest cook-time and work your way to the one that’s the quickest. After that I tossed the warm pasta with garlic-infused olive oil, arugula, spinach, cannellini beans, walnuts, Parmesan and lemon zest.
Pasta with Baby Greens, Beans and Walnuts
Pasta with Baby Greens, Beans and Walnuts
Adapted from Everyday Food April 2008

12 ounces short pasta (farfalle, rotelle, fusilli, orecchiette, penne)
1/4 cup olive oil
4 garlic cloves, peeled and thinly sliced
1-15 ounce can cannellini beans, drained and rinsed
1/3 cup roughly chopped toasted walnuts
1 ounce grated Parmesan plus shaved Parmesan for serving
Zest of half a lemon
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper

Cook the pasta until al dente according to package instructions. If you are using multiple shapes, cook them in one pot of salted boiling water starting with the pasta that takes the longest and adding shapes per their recommended cook-time, with the quickest being added last. Use a slotted spoon to transfer the pasta to a large bowl.

Heat the olive oil in a small skillet over medium heat. Add the garlic and cook for a few minutes until fragrant and golden brown.

Stir the garlic-infused olive oil, beans, walnuts, Parmesan, lemon zest, salt and pepper into the pasta. Top with shaved Parmesan before serving.

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